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Candidate Questionnaire: Jay Chaudhuri, NCGA Senate

Name as it appears on the ballot: Jay J. Chaudhuri

Party affiliation: Democrat

Campaign website: jayfornc.com

Occupation & employer: Attorney, Cohen Milstein Sellers & Toll

1. What in your background qualifies you to represent the people of North Carolina effectively? What would you cite as your three biggest career accomplishments?

I’ve spent my career fighting for and working on behalf of the people of North Carolina. For two and a half decades, I’ve worked at the highest levels of all three branches in state government, including serving as senior counsel to former Attorney General Roy Cooper and State Treasurer Janet Cowell. I’m running for the State Senate again so I can continue fighting for the people and this state I so deeply love.

My three biggest accomplishments: First, as Special Counsel to Attorney General Cooper, I led an investigation behalf of 50 Attorneys General that resulted in a landmark agreement with two leading social networking sites, MySpace and Facebook, to better protect children from Internet predators. For my effort, the National Association of Attorneys General honored me with the Marvin Award, given to an individual who furthers the association’s goal.

Second, as General Counsel to former State Treasurer Cowell, I played a key role in uncovering alleged wrongdoing that led to eight investment managers paying the pension fund back $15 million and tougher, cutting-edge ethical standards for these managers and Department of State Treasurer employees, including the most restrictive revolving door policy in state government.

Finally, as a State Senator, I played the lead role in recruiting a global information technology company to establish an Innovation Hub that will create 2,000 new jobs and pay $72,000 a year, above the Wake County median salary. That recruitment means one of the largest job announcements in the state this past decade.

2. What do you believe to be the three most pressing issues facing the next General Assembly? What steps do you believe the state should take to address them?

I believe the pandemic has laid bare the inequalities of our state and reminds us of our important priorities. First, we must stop the coronavirus so we can restart the economy. Now more than ever, we must expand access to health care for every North Carolinian. To stop COVID-19, we must expand Medicaid so that everyone can afford testing and treatment for the virus. Second, we must support frontline workers and small businesses hit by the pandemic rather than more tax breaks for big corporations. Finally, we must focus on strong public schools for our children, with higher teacher pay and more resources for the classroom.

3. Do you believe the Republican tax cuts over the last decade have been effective in stimulating the state’s economy? If given the choice, are there any tax cuts you would rescind or any new taxes you would enact? If so, what would you put the additional revenue toward?

I believe the evidence is clear the General Assembly’s tax code favors the wealthy and big corporations and burdens working- and middle-class families. That’s due to the elimination of credits and deductions like the Earned Income Tax Credit for working families and child-care expenses.

I believe we should eliminate some of the past tax breaks for the wealthiest and big corporations so they can pay their fair share of taxes. As part of this reform, I would push for legislation that requires “combined” reporting that would close dozens of loopholes for large multi-state corporations. As General Counsel & Senior Policy Advisor to State Treasurer Janet Cowell, I helped propose the same idea as part of Treasurer Cowell’s tax reform plan. Three commission on modernizing our states finances have made a similar recommendation for mandatory “combined” reporting. I believe such reform would level the playing field on taxes between small businesses and large, out-of-state corporations.

I believe such additional revenue should go towards public education and building a stronger safety net.

4. North Carolina’s minimum wage is among the lowest in the country. Do you support raising the minimum wage, and if so by how much? If not, what other initiatives would you take to support low-income families in North Carolina?

A man or woman earning $7.25 per hour and working full-time can be expected to make $14,500 a year, $4,000 below the federal poverty level for a family of three. That’s unacceptable. I support the raising the minimum wage to $15 so we can pull thousands of parents with children out of poverty and even help close the gender pay gap. That’s why I’ve been supported by the Triangle Labor Council.

5. Housing affordability is rapidly becoming an issue in the major metros like Charlotte and Raleigh and pushing low-income families further from their jobs. What policies would you support to ensure North Carolinians can live near where they work?

I witness the gentrification in my Senate district when I used to drop my daughter off to middle school every day. I believe our General Assembly can play a key role. That’s why I’ve sponsored legislation to double our affordable housing budget, and that’s why I’ve sponsored homestead exemption legislation to reduce or freeze property taxes for long-term eligible homeowners to promote neighborhood stability and preserve character.

6. Scientists say the increased threat of hurricanes and the resulting coastal devastation is only expected to worsen in the coming years due to climate change. Please state three specific policies you support to reduce carbon emissions and safeguard the environment in North Carolina.

An overwhelming majority of scientists agree that climate change is real, and humans are the primary cause of it. In 2011, our General Assembly literally passed a law that outlawed climate change science. If our State fails to act now, we will find parts of our treasured coast underwater.

To protect our environment, I support three main policies. First, I believe we should authorize the Environmental Management Commission to adopt rules to decarbonize the electricity sector by 70 percent by 2030, similar to the Department of Environmental Quality’s Clean Energy Plan. Second, I believe we should improve access to the grid, reduce cost of interconnecting to the grid, and increase clean energy research and development to create tens of thousands of new green economy jobs. Finally, I believe we must protect our coast by opposing offshore oil drilling. I believe such drilling forgets the economic, environmental, and public health disaster of the BP Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico that cost those communities more than $100 billion in losses. Second,

7. Do you believe assault weapons should be commercially available in North Carolina? Do you support universal background checks for all gun purchases? What policies do you support to address gun violence?

Yes. During my first term, I led the fight in the State Senate on reducing gun violence in our schools. I served as the primary sponsor of the Safer Schools, Healthier Kids Act, a bill that authorizes extreme risk protection orders to temporarily restrict firearms if a person poses danger of physical harm to themselves or others. This bill also requires a permit to purchase assault-style firearms and long guns, raises the age of sale of these firearms, and bans instruments such as bump stocks and trigger cranks. Finally, this bill allocates $65 million for building improvements $40 million in flexible funding for school nurses, psychologists, and social workers and $7 million to fund school resource officers. Because of my work on reducing gun violence, I’ve been asked to speak at several Wake County student walkouts. I was also the only State Senator to speak at the March for Your Lives rally in Raleigh. That’s why I’ve been endorsed as a Mom’s Demand Action Gun Sense candidate.

8. Do you support the Black Lives Matter Movement? What steps would you take to address racial equity in North Carolina?

Yes, I believe Black Lives Matter. I believe we must address racial equity in different areas. At the economic level, we must restore the State’s Earned Income Tax Credit, one of the most powerful and proven tools to combat poverty. We must also restore child-care subsidies. At the educational level, we must work quickly to implement the recommendations from the Governor’s Commission on Access to Sound Basic Education that provides well-trained teachers, well-trained principals, and resources necessary to support the educational need of all children, including at-risk children. Finally, at the criminal justice level, we must empower citizen oversight boards, ban chokeholds, prohibit racial profiling, and require more transparency about the use of force.

9. One of BLM’s key demands is police accountability, however, municipalities have struggled to enact oversight boards with teeth as police records are safeguarded by state statute. Would you support bills that would make public certain police records, such as internal investigations after use of force incidents, body camera footage, and personnel files?

I believe an oversight board should be a part of police reform. I believe it can build trust. I believe it can improve relationships between law enforcement and the community, increase public understanding of the nature of the police work, promote community policing, and reassure a skeptical public that the department investigates a complaint fairly and thoroughly.

As a general rule, I would support making certain evidence public. However, I believe the best way to do so is to make sure that an oversight board is professional, has support staff that understands both the community and law enforcement, and complies with proper legal standards for such proceedings and evidence.

10. The battle over gerrymandering has stalled out in the courts. What do you believe needs to happen with the state’s district maps? Would you support an independent process for drawing new legislative and congressional districts?

I believe we should establish an Independent Redistricting Commission, a body comprised of citizens, not politicians, that draws our legislative districts. That why I’ve served as a primary sponsor of a bill to establish a Nonpartisan Independent Redistricting Commission. I also believe such a commission would save our state millions of dollars in litigation, better reflect the voters’ will, and give voters confidence in our political system.

11. Republicans boast to have increased school funding during their tenure controlling the legislature. Do you believe the state’s public schools are adequately funded? If not, would you support a tax increase to pay for it?

As a product of Fayetteville public schools and father to two children who attend Wake County public schools, I believe we must do much more for our public schools. This Republican General Assembly decided to put a priority on a billion-dollar tax cut, but they didn’t put a priority on renovating crumbling schools, purchasing much-need classroom supplies, and helping students who can’t afford to pay for lunch

How do we pay for more investment in our schools? First, we should increase the income tax rate on millionaires. Second, we can push for legislation that requires “combined” reporting that would close dozens of loopholes for large multi-state corporations. As former General Counsel and Senior Policy Advisor to State Treasurer Cowell, I helped propose the same idea as part of Treasurer Cowell’s tax reform plan in 2011. Three other commissions on modernizing our state's finances have made a similar recommendation for mandatory “combined” reporting.

12. Research suggests the state’s charter school system is increasing segregation in the schools. Do you support the expansion of charter schools? Why or why not?

At this moment, I do not believe we should expand charter schools. That’s because our state budget for charter schools has grown from $16 million in 1997 to $580 million in 2017. Yet, to date, we have not studied the innovation in teachings from such schools or understood how such public dollars are spent.

That’s why I’ve sponsored a bill to establish a legislative study committee on the impact of charter schools on local school administrative units, the extent to which charter schools successfully serve underserved populations, and overall academic performance. It would also stop an expansion of charter schools until the study is completed (Senate Bill 247).

13. More than 3,000 North Carolinians have died from COVID-10 since the onset of the pandemic and thousands more left with crippling medical debt. Do you believe the state needs to invest in an expansion of Medicaid? How would you address healthcare affordability for North Carolinians?

Yes, I believe the expansion of Medicaid should be our number one priority, especially during a pandemic. It’s clear now, more than ever, that we must expand healthcare for every North Carolinian. To stop the virus and to prevent future public health crisis, we should expand Medicaid so everyone can afford testing and treatment for the virus. The latest data suggests that we have more than 650,000 citizens without health care coverage. We are now just one of 12 states that has not expanded Medicaid. Such expansion would create 40,000 new jobs, too. In addition, we must reduce the cost of prescription drugs and guarantee coverage for preexisting conditions.

14. The state’s Voter ID law, which has been criticized as targeted to disenfranchise African American voters, is temporarily blocked by the court. After the election, would you support repealing this law? Why or why not?

I would absolutely support repealing the state’s Voter ID law. I believe support for this law was not about electoral integrity. As I stated on the Senate floor, this law disproportionately impacts African-Americans, Hispanics, seniors, young people, and disable voters.

15. North Carolina has not executed anyone since 2006, and challenges to the constitutionality of the state’s death penalty continue. Would you support the repeal of the death penalty in North Carolina? If not, do you believe the legislature should change the law to restart executions?

Based on several conversations and readings over the years, I believe our current administration of the death penalty is racially biased. That’s why I do not support restarting executions in our state. That’s also why I support restoring the Racial Justice Act that the General Assembly repealed in 2013. This law allowed defendants to use statistics to challenge a death sentence if they proved race was a factor in imposing the death penalty.

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Interlinking Code for Jay - pets

A view from inside the World Court at Brandeis International Business School

Peter Petri, the Carl J. Shapiro Professor of International Finance

Brandeis International Business School celebrates its 25th anniversary with an all-alumni reunion Sept. 20 through 22.

In the late 1980s, in the wake of the Latin American debt crisis but before the fall of the Berlin Wall and the spectacular crash of Japan’s economy, Peter Petri had a palpable sense that transactions around the world were speeding up and beginning to intertwine, often with unintended consequences for corporations — and countries.

“The world was changing fast,” recalls Petri, then an associate professor of economics at Brandeis. The “third world” was becoming the “developing world.” Parts of the developing world were soon developed. If mighty Japan was in trouble, other East Asian economies were surging ahead. Latin America, too, was on the move again.

Nothing less than an “economic earthquake” was underway, Petri says. The economic imbalances, not to mention the social and political upheaval, begged for new rule books for business policy and the analysis of business opportunities.

A graduate professional school focused on the world’s rapidly interconnecting economies could add value, Petri and some of his economist colleagues believed. “We wanted to explore the workings of the global economy, and design a comprehensive and intellectually demanding program on the practical implications of all this change,” he explains.

The question was how to leverage the Brandeis economics department’s strengths in the new international arena. Petri and his colleagues didn’t want to create a traditional — read “Harvard” — business school. In that arena, a tiny upstart would struggle to compete for students. Also, Petri says, “we saw general management as a genteel field that belonged to the Establishment.”

Students at the Sachar International Center in 1994

After much discussion, Petri and his colleagues determined their approach. “Finance was the quickest way to get to the nuts and bolts of how the world was changing,” he says.

Advocating an ambitious business curriculum focused on globalization — before that trend’s economic significance was recognized as critical — was initially a hard sell. But today Brandeis International Business School, which celebrates its 25th anniversary this year, is well-positioned to explore and troubleshoot the systemic shortcomings, rolling crises and collateral effects caused by societies grappling with rapid change.

Consider these examples: The European Union deals with a refugee influx and ultra-nationalist, authoritarian governments on its fringes. Britain has elected a volatile former journalist as its prime minister. Russia seems to lurk everywhere, particularly in cyberspace, conducting proxy attacks on Western financial and political systems. Traditional currencies are being threatened by blockchain technology. The United States and China, the world’s two most powerful economies, are engaged in a slugfest over a massive trade imbalance and bragging rights to next-generation technologies in sensitive areas like artificial intelligence and cellular communications.

The International Business School’s founding was prescient — if anything presents a challenge for the leaders of countries and companies, it’s negotiating economic interdependence in a digital world that was unimaginable 25, or even 10, years ago. And its brand is rooted in scrappy “hard” fields, such as the economics of exchange rates, new financial instruments, data analytics and fintech .

The Lemberg Program in International Economics and Finance, the business school’s earliest direct ancestor, was launched informally in 1987 in an entrepreneurial atmosphere, with Petri as its founding director. It offered a master’s degree to an initial class of 12. In 1994, the Lemberg Program and a new PhD program were institutionalized as the Graduate School of International Economics and Finance, with Petri as dean. Fifty students from a handful of countries were enrolled, including many Fulbright Scholars, a practice that continues today.

In 2003, the school was renamed once again, as Brandeis International Business School. As it grew, it added faculty at the frontiers of the new world of business, including Stephen Cecchetti, the Rosen Family Chair in International Finance, formerly chief economist at the Bank for International Settlements former faculty member Catherine Mann, who was chief economist at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and associate professor of finance Anna Scherbina, a senior economist at the U.S. Council of Economic Advisers and an expert on cybersecurity analysis.

This fall, the International Business School welcomed an entering class of almost 300 students representing 100 countries — now, that’s globalization.

Petri, the Carl J. Shapiro Professor of International Finance, and a nonresident scholar at the Brookings Institution, is disarmingly relaxed for someone who is often trying to solve several multilayered trade puzzles at the same time. His work extends far beyond Waltham to Washington, D.C. Europe and Asia — particularly Japan and China — where he strategizes with counterparts and policymakers.

China’s economic development in recent decades enabled it to leapfrog directly into the digital era, leaving many international analysts scratching their heads. In response, the business school curriculum — by emphasizing experiential learning and a familiarity with globalized, data-driven transactions — is producing adept, innovative corporate and government economists, and investment managers.

Dean Kathryn Graddy, the Fred and Rita Richman Distinguished Professor in Economics

These alumni now work everywhere — London, Shanghai, New York City, Hong Kong, Berlin and Tokyo, to name just a few crossroads of global decision making. “In an environment like this, it’s very important to continue expanding relationships around the world,” says Kathryn Graddy, the Fred and Rita Richman Distinguished Professor in Economics, who became dean in 2018. “Whether it’s China, India or Japan, this is when we double down.”

Graddy is already laying a foundation for the next 25 years. “We are academically rigorous, experiential and global,” she says. The International Business School’s quantitative strength has been reinforced: All its programs are now STEM-designated, enabling eligible international students to work in the U.S. for up to three years after graduation. The curriculum includes the Hassenfeld Fellow Overseas Immersion Program, which offers students hands-on experience at companies around the world, a feature not found at many business schools.

Though seemingly counterintuitive for a school Graddy calls Brandeis’ “global arm,” its core mission can be summed up by an adjective rarely applied to business schools: “human.” “We care deeply about preparing individuals to be global leaders,” Graddy says.

The humanistic focus dates back to the school’s early days. Board of Trustees member Lan Xue ’90, MA’91, who graduated in the Lemberg Program’s second class, came to Brandeis as an undergraduate through a Wien International Scholarship. Today, she runs a billion-dollar global hedge fund from Hong Kong and Shanghai. Xue has given Brandeis $1 million for student scholarships. “One part of American culture I value a lot is the idea that you pay it forward,” she says. “I’m now in a position where I can contribute to what I hope will be a boost for the next generation.”

Chinese students represent the single largest international group at the business school at Brandeis generally and at U.S. universities, where, this year alone, 360,000 Chinese men and women are enrolled. For the most part, the Chinese students who came to Brandeis in the 1980s had little money, relying on Chinese government funding or scholarship programs like the Wien to pay for their education. Most enrolled as undergraduates. By the late 1990s, the number of Chinese students entering Brandeis was greater, and most were going directly to the business school.

Petri — who, while consulting in Asia for the World Bank, had met many high-performing U.S.-educated Chinese officials — realized China could be a key area of focus for the school. Today, in fact, a couple of International Business School alumni work within the World Bank’s top tiers. More than that, business school alumni have been spreading the word about Brandeis in China for 25 years, attracting Chinese students to IBS as well as to graduate and undergraduate programs in scientific research and computer science.

So far, more than 1,400 Chinese alumni — most of them International Business School graduates — have returned to China. President Ron Liebowitz hopes to establish a presence in China, to add cohesion to the alumni community and ease future graduates’ transition to the workforce. In addition, he says, he’d like to see more Brandeis undergraduates study abroad in China.

To underscore his interest, Liebowitz made his first trip to China in April, returning again in July for a working vacation. As the U.S. and China try to negotiate a difficult time in their relationship, the Chinese “seem very appreciative that we are making the effort to be in China,” says Graddy.

During the April trip, Liebowitz presented Roberta Lipson ’76, who exemplifies the ever-expanding range of business opportunities in China, with the 2019 Asper Award for Global Entrepreneurship. In 1994, Lipson co-founded what has become one of China’s largest networks of private hospitals and modern health-care facilities. In July, her company, United Family Healthcare, was acquired by New Frontier Corp. and will be listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

At the end of the award ceremony, in front of a predominantly Chinese audience of 150 International Business School alumni, parents and friends, Lipson’s acceptance remarks were characteristically modest. “Brandeis gives its students the opportunity to pursue their passions,” she said in colloquial Mandarin. “For that, I am forever grateful.”

Frank Gibney Jr. is a writer and editor. He often writes about East Asia, where he was a correspondent for Newsweek and Time during the 1980s and ’90s.


A method for providing an interconnection relationship between a product and a desired location on a global communications network. A machine readable product code is disposed on the product machine readable product code, the machine readable product code having encoded product information contained therein. The product code has no routing information embedded therein which would allow the product code, in and of itself, to cause routing to the desired location over any path on the network. The machine readable product code is read and decoded. The extra.

A method for providing an interconnection relationship between a product and a desired location on a global communications network. A machine readable product code is disposed on the product machine readable product code, the machine readable product code having encoded product information contained therein. The product code has no routing information embedded therein which would allow the product code, in and of itself, to cause routing to the desired location over any path on the network. The machine readable product code is read and decoded. The extracted product code is then converted for routing information over the network to the desired location, which routing information defines the manner by which a user or a computer at a user location wherein the machine readable product code was read can communicate with the desired location via an interconnection therewith.

대표청구항 ▼

What is claimed is: 1. A method for providing an interconnection relationship between a product that has disposed thereon a machine readable product code on the product, and a desired location on a global communications network, the machine readable product code having encoded therein product code information and the purpose thereof being other than routing to the desired location on the network, the product code information having no routing information embedded therein which would allow the product code information, in and of itself, to cause routing .

What is claimed is: 1. A method for providing an interconnection relationship between a product that has disposed thereon a machine readable product code on the product, and a desired location on a global communications network, the machine readable product code having encoded therein product code information and the purpose thereof being other than routing to the desired location on the network, the product code information having no routing information embedded therein which would allow the product code information, in and of itself, to cause routing to the desired location over any path on the network, comprising the steps of: reading a machine readable product code at a user location on the network in response to the step of reading the machine readable product code, and without user intervention of a user at the user location on the network: assembling a message packet containing information representative of the machine readable product code and the product code information contained therein, transmitting the message packet to an intermediate node on the network having associated therewith a database which has stored therein relationships between the information representative of the machine readable product code and the product code information contained therein and routing information for at least one desired location on the network, in accordance with the stored relationships in the database, converting the received information representative of the machine readable product code and the product code information contained therein to routing information over the network to the at least one desired location associated therewith in the database, which routing information, associated with an instructional code, is returned to the user location and defines the manner by which a user or a computer at a user location wherein the machine readable product code was read can communicate with the at least one desired location via an interconnection therewith, receiving at the user location from the intermediate node on the network the routing information and associated instructional code that instructs the user node to connect to the at least one desired location on the network, and connecting the user location to the at least one desired location in accordance with the received instructional code and associated routing information such that connection to the at least one desired location is controlled by the intermediate node through the instructional code, wherein all connections to desired locations are controlled only by the intermediate node and not by any actions at the user location other than the operation of reading, and wherein actions at the user location do not prevent connection or affect connection to the desired location. 2. The method of claim 1, wherein the product code comprises a UPC. 3. The method of claim 1, wherein the product code comprises an ISBN. 4. The method of claim 1, wherein the product code comprises an LAN. 5. The method of claim 1, wherein the routing information comprises a universal resource locator (URL) that comprises a unique locator on the network to the at least one desired location. 6. The method of claim 1, wherein the step of converting comprises: providing the database having stored therein an associative table which relates a plurality of information representative of the machine readable product code and the product code information contained therein with associated desired locations on the network, each of the information representative of the machine readable product code and the product code information contained therein having routing information to that associated desired location associated therewith and comparing the received information representative of the machine readable product code and the product code information contained therein with the associative table in the database to determine the routing information to the at least one desired location. 7. The method of claim 1, wherein the step of reading comprises scanning of the machine readable product code with a bar code scanner and wherein the machine readable product code comprises a bar code. 8. The method of claim 1, wherein the information representative of the machine readable product code and the product code information contained therein comprises the product code information and further comprising the step of extracting the product code form the read machine readable product code prior to the step of assembling. 9. The method of claim 8, wherein the step of extracting comprises the step of decoding the machine readable product code to extract the product code information therefrom. 10. The method of claim 9, wherein the machine readable product code comprises a bar code having the product code information encoded therein in a plurality of lines of varying width, each associated with machine readable codes, and the step of decoding is operable to extract the machine readable product code from the lines during the step of reading, which step of reading comprises scanning the bar code with an optical bar code scanner. 11. The method of claim 1, wherein the step of assembling the message packet comprises forming a data transmission that is comprised of a first field having associated therewith source information as to the location on the network of the user location, as second field having associated therewith destination information as to the location of the intermediate node on the network and a third and data field having associated therewith the information representative of the machine readable product code and the product code information contained therein. 12. A method for providing an interconnection relationship between a product that has disposed thereon a machine readable product code on the product, and a target location on a global communications network, the machine readable product code having encoded product code information contained therein, the product code information having no routing information embedded therein and the purpose thereof being other than routing to the target location on the network which would allow the product code information, in and of itself, to cause routing to the target location over any path on the network, comprising the steps of: reading a machine readable product code at a user location on the network in response to the step of reading the machine readable product code, and without user intervention of a user at the user location on the network: assembling a message packet containing information representative of the machine readable product code and the product code information contained therein transmitting the message packet to an intermediate node on the network in accordance with intermediate node routing information at the user location on the network the intermediate node having associated therewith a database which has stored therein relationships between the information representative of the machine readable product code and the product code information contained therein and target routing information for at least one target location on the network comparing the received information representative of the machine readable product code and the product code information contained therein with the stored relationships in the database and, if there is a match, selecting the target routing information from the database associated with the matching relationship, which target routing information is then associated with an instructional code and returned to the user location, which instructional code defines the manner by which a user or a computer at a user location wherein the machine readable product code was read will communicate with the at least one target location via an interconnection therewith receiving at the user location from the intermediate node on the network the target routing information and associated instructional code that instructs the user node to connect to the at least one target location on the network and connecting the user location to the at least one target location in accordance with the received instructional code and associated target routing information such that connection to the at least one target location is controlled by the intermediate node through the instructional code, wherein all connections to target locations are controlled only by the intermediate node and not by any actions at the user location other than the operation of reading, and wherein actions at the user location do not prevent connection or affect connection to the target location. 13. A method for providing an interconnection relationship between a product that has disposed thereon a machine readable product code on the product, and a target location on a global communications network, the machine readable product code having encoded product code information contained therein, the product code information having no routing information embedded therein and the purpose thereof being other than routing to the target location on the network which would allow the product code information, in and of itself, to cause routing to the target location over any path on the network, comprising the steps of: reading a machine readable product code at a user location on the network in response to the step of reading the machine readable product code, and without user intervention of a user at the user location on the network: assembling a message packet containing information representative of the machine readable product code and the product code information contained therein transmitting the message packet to an intermediate node on the network in accordance with intermediate node routing information at the user location on the network, which intermediate node has associated therewith a database which has stored therein relationships between the information representative of the machine readable product code and the product code information contained therein and target routing information for at least one target location on the network which intermediate node is operable to compare the received information representative of the machine readable product code and the product code information contained therein with the stored relationships in the database and, if there is a match, select the target routing information from the database associated with the matching relationship, which target routing information is then associated with an instructional code and returned to the user location, which instructional code defines the manner by which a user or a computer at a user location wherein the machine readable product code was read will communicate with the at least one target location via an interconnection therewith receiving at the user location from the intermediate node on the network the target routing information and associated instructional code that instructs the user node to connect to the at least one target location on the network and connecting the user location to the at least one target location in accordance with the received instructional code and associated target routing information such that connection to the at least one target location is controlled by the intermediate node through the instructional code, wherein all connections to target locations are controlled only by the intermediate node and not by any actions at the user location other than the operation of reading, and wherein actions at the user location do not prevent connection or affect connection to the target location. 14. The method of claim 13, wherein the step of assembling the message packet comprises forming a data transmission that is comprised of a first field having associated therewith source information as to the location on the network of the user location, as second field having associated therewith intermediate node routing information as to the location of the intermediate node on the network and a third and data field having associated therewith the information representative of the machine readable product code and the product code information contained therein. 15. The method of claim 13, wherein the step of reading comprises scanning of the machine readable product code with a bar code scanner and wherein the machine readable product code comprises a bar code. 16. The method of claim 13, wherein the information representative of the machine readable product code and the product code information contained therein comprises the product code information and further comprising the step of extracting the product code form the read machine readable product code prior to the step of assembling. 17. The method of claim 16, wherein the step of extracting comprises the step of decoding the machine readable product code to extract the product code information therefrom. 18. The method of claim 17, wherein the machine readable product code comprises a bar code having the product code information encoded therein in a plurality of lines of varying width, each associated with machine readable codes, and the step of decoding is operable to extract the machine readable product code from the lines during the step of reading, which step of reading comprises scanning the bar code with an optical bar code scanner. 19. A method for providing an interconnection relationship between a product that has disposed thereon a machine readable product code on the product, and a desired location on a global communications network, the machine readable product code having encoded product code information contained therein and the purpose thereof being other than routing to the desired location on the network, the product code information having no routing information embedded therein which would allow the product code information, in and of itself, to cause routing to the desired location over any path on the network, comprising the steps of: reading a machine readable product code at a user location on the network in response to the step of reading the machine readable product code, and without user intervention of a user at the user location on the network, extracting the product code information from the machine readable product code assembling a message packet containing the product code information transmitting the message packet to an intermediate node on the network having associated therewith a database which has stored therein relationships between the product code information and routing information for at least one desired location on the network wherein, at the intermediate location and in accordance with the stored relationships in the database, the received product code information has been converted to routing information over the network to the at least one desired location associated therewith in the database, which routing information, associated with an instructional code, is returned to the user location and defines the manner by which a user or a computer at a user location wherein the machine readable product code was read can communicate with the at least one desired location via an interconnection therewith receiving at the user location from the intermediate node on the network the routing information and associated instructional code that instructs the user node to connect to the at least one desired location on the network and the user location being connected to the at least one desired location in accordance with the received instructional code and associated routing information such that connection to the at least one desired location is controlled by the intermediate node through the instructional code, wherein all connections to desired locations are controlled only by the intermediate node and not by any actions at the user location other than the operation of reading, and wherein actions at the user location do not prevent connection or affect connection to the desired location. 20. The method of claim 19, wherein the product code comprises a UPC. 21. The method of claim 19, wherein the product code comprises an ISBN. 22. The method of claim 19, wherein the product code comprises an LAN. 23. The method of claim 19, wherein the routing information comprises a universal resource locator (URL) that comprises a unique locator on the network to the at least one desired location. 24. The method of claim 19, wherein the step of converting comprises: providing the database having stored therein an associative table which relates a plurality of product code information with associated desired locations on the network, each of the product code information having routing information to that associated desired location associated therewith and comparing the extracted product code information with the associative table in the database to determine the routing information to the at least one desired location. 25. The method of claim 19, wherein the step of reading comprises scanning of the machine readable code with a bar code scanner and wherein the machine readable code comprises a bar code. 26. The method of claim 20, wherein the step of extracting comprises the step of decoding the machine readable code to extract the product code information therefrom. 27. The method of claim 26, wherein the machine readable product code comprises a bar code having the product code information encoded therein in a plurality of lines of varying width, each associated with machine readable codes, and the step of decoding is operable to extract the machine readable code from the lines during the step of reading, which step of reading comprises scanning the bar code with an optical bar code scanner. 28. The method of claim 19, wherein the step of assembling the message packet comprises forming a data transmission that is comprised of a first field having associated therewith source information as to the location on the network of the user location, as second field having associated therewith destination information as to the location of the intermediate node on the network and a third and data field having associated therewith the product code information.


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