How many litter boxes for 2 cats



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How many litter boxes for 2 cats?

I live in a 1 bedroom apartment with a livingroom, bathroom and kitchen. There is a small fenced in yard but the house is located near a main road, so there is a lot of traffic noise. I have a 4 year old and a 16 month old female cat. They both love to play and I think they're pretty well behaved, but when they have accidents (which happens often), I'm at a loss for how to best clean them up. I have a litter box in the bathroom and a litter tray in the kitchen but their fur gets everywhere, so I'm thinking about getting a second litter box in the living room and getting them to use the one in the kitchen. Would I be doing them any favors by doing this? I've seen people with a couple of cats who live in the same space and use one or two litter boxes in the living room. Thanks for the advice.

I would not recommend putting the litter boxes in a place they are close to traffic and/or where they could be easily tripped over. The litter box must be a minimum of 16"x16"x16" and placed on a non-slip, anti-tip mat (available at pet shops). It needs to be close enough to the door to be accessible, but also must be out of the way of foot traffic. If your cats will have access to the kitchen or a living room, I would suggest putting the litter boxes there. I would also recommend using litter that is a high-clumping product, so that you have to do very little to clean the litter boxes. A large, deep litter box filled with a high-clumping litter will only need to be cleaned out about once every 6 weeks to 1 month. I usually find that the easiest way to empty the boxes is to place them over the bathtub and let the clumping litter pour into the tub. When the litter has all been removed from the tub, take the litter outside and flush it down the toilet or into the sewer. If you would like more information on litter box hygiene, I would recommend that you read my litter box maintenance article here:

I can't stress the importance of the litter box being kept dry. The litter needs to be moist, but it also needs to be dry. If the litter is damp, it will start to attract bugs and the litter will start to smell. A good way to keep the litter dry is to place the litter box outside where it can collect some of the rain, but then to turn on the faucet so that the water runs out of the box, thus keeping the litter damp. Another important reason to keep the litter dry is that it keeps the feces from sticking to the box. If the feces become dry and sticky, it can form into small balls and become difficult to remove. If the feces become dry, the box is not an effective way to trap them.

I would not recommend putting the litter boxes in a place they are close to traffic and/or where they could be easily tripped over. The litter box must be a minimum of 16"x16"x16" and placed on a non-slip, anti-tip mat (available at pet shops). It needs to be close enough to the door to be accessible, but also must be out of the way of foot traffic. If your cats will have access to the kitchen or a living room, I would suggest putting the litter boxes there. I would also recommend using litter that is a high-clumping product, so that you have to do very little to clean the litter boxes. A large, deep litter box filled with a high-clumping litter will only need to be cleaned out about once every 6 weeks to 1 month. I usually find that the easiest way to empty the boxes is to place them over the bathtub and let the clumping litter pour into the tub. When the litter has all been removed from the tub, take the litter outside and flush it down the toilet or into the sewer. If you would like more information on litter box hygiene, I would recommend that you read my litter box maintenance article here:

The only advice I would give is to be sure that the litter box is a dry box. I used to have cats that would use my bathroom for litter boxes because they liked to be near a bathroom and I didn't want the urine smell. The litter box in the bathroom had a lid on it, but because it was a plastic box and the cats liked to scratch around on the lid, it would get wet if it rained outside. So I would clean it out every day and put the box in a dry place, like my bathroom closet, for the rest of the week. The litter box in the bathroom also took up a lot of space that could be used by a cat. If you use a litter box in your bathroom, I recommend that you use a cardboard box with a lid so the cat can scratch and keep the box dry.

I have a 2 year old male cat that I rescued about a year ago. We have a small fenced in yard with a door that leads to our apartment. He has never been outside since being rescued so he has no idea how it is to be outside. He loves to come in the bathroom and sit in the tub when I shower, and when I'm not looking he is jumping on the toilet. I'm considering buying a small litter box that can sit on the floor, and would be placed near his litter box in the bathroom. Would this be a good idea, or am I being selfish? He has never pooped in a litter box before, and the bathroom has a high-clumping litter and a toilet bowl that has a special cleaner that removes any hair, etc. I'm worried about him not wanting to use it. I also have a 16 month old female cat and she uses the litter box in the kitchen. If I go down to the bathroom and use the toilet, will she use the bathroom too? I don't have a problem with this, and I want to avoid it because it's the main bathroom. I'd like to have a litter box in the living room, and in the bathroom.

I have a 2 year old male cat



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